Integrate the Microkernel FAQ into the general FAQ.
[hurd-web.git] / microkernel / faq / multiserver_microkernel.mdwn
diff --git a/microkernel/faq/multiserver_microkernel.mdwn b/microkernel/faq/multiserver_microkernel.mdwn
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index ca9b217..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,26 +0,0 @@
-[[!meta copyright="Copyright © 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009 Free
-Software Foundation, Inc."]]
-
-[[!meta license="""[[!toggle id="license" text="GFDL 1.2+"]][[!toggleable
-id="license" text="Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this
-document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or
-any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant
-Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts.  A copy of the license
-is included in the section entitled
-[[GNU Free Documentation License|/fdl]]."]]"""]]
-
-[[!meta title="What is a Multiserver Microkernel?"]]
-
-A Microkernel has nothing to do with the size of the kernel.  Rather, it refers
-to the functionality that the kernel provides.  It is generally agreed that
-this is; a set of interfaces to allow processes to communicate and a way to
-talk to the hardware.  *Software drivers*, as we like to call them, are then
-implemented in user space as servers.  The most obvious examples of these are
-the TCP/IP stack, the ext2 filesystem and NFS.  In the case of the Hurd, users
-now have access to functionality that, in a monolithic kernel, they could never
-use, but now, because the server runs in user space as the user that started
-it, they may, for instance, mount an FTP filesystem in their home directory.
-
-For more information about the design of the Hurd, read the paper by Thomas
-Bushnell, BSG:
-[[Towards_a_New_Strategy_of_OS_Design|hurd-paper]].