summaryrefslogtreecommitdiff
path: root/hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
Diffstat (limited to 'hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn')
-rw-r--r--hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn12
1 files changed, 11 insertions, 1 deletions
diff --git a/hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn b/hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn
index a927db5..77f3964 100644
--- a/hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn
+++ b/hurd/translator/wishlist_2.mdwn
@@ -70,7 +70,17 @@ Here's an [idea](http://www.circlemud.org/~jelson/software/fusd/docs/node13.html
* "One particularly interesting application of FUSD that we've found very useful is as a way to let regular user-space libraries export device file APIs. For example, imagine you had a library which factored large composite numbers. Typically, it might have a C interface--say, a function called `int *factorize(int bignum)`. With FUSD, it's possible to create a device file interface--say, a device called `/dev/factorize` to which clients can `write(2)` a big number, then `read(2)` back its factors.
-* This may sound strange, but device file APIs have at least three advantages over a typical library API. First, it becomes much more language independent--any language that can make system calls can access the factorization library. Second, the factorization code is running in a different address space; if it crashes, it won't crash or corrupt the caller. Third, and most interestingly, it is possible to use `select(2)` to wait for the factorization to complete. `select(2)` would make it easy for a client to factor a large number while remaining responsive to other events that might happen in the meantime. In other words, FUSD allows normal user-space libraries to integrate seamlessly with UNIX's existing, POSIX-standard event notification interface: `select(2)`."
+* This may sound strange, but device file APIs have at least three advantages
+ over a typical library API. First, it becomes much more language
+ independent--any language that can make [[system call]]s can access the
+ factorization library. Second, the factorization code is running in a
+ different address space; if it crashes, it won't crash or corrupt the
+ caller. Third, and most interestingly, it is possible to use `select(2)` to
+ wait for the factorization to complete. `select(2)` would make it easy for a
+ client to factor a large number while remaining responsive to other events
+ that might happen in the meantime. In other words, FUSD allows normal
+ user-space libraries to integrate seamlessly with UNIX's existing,
+ POSIX-standard event notification interface: `select(2)`."
## <a name="Mail"> Mail </a>