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authorhttps://www.google.com/accounts/o8/id?id=AItOawmOlZj6Ku6rQ8E1D1Wl2ExOtSuLcJNVfyY <Svante@web>2011-03-28 21:00:17 +0000
committerGNU Hurd web pages engine <web-hurd@gnu.org>2011-03-28 21:00:17 +0000
commit13dfdd1391c0c8a5bd93e72233a9cb0497002ae5 (patch)
tree836f4b6c7c08d6a6f0f5618fbb9df5799de7582f /hurd/running/qemu.mdwn
parent1904698b384d0ec8b76fc2fb9a40c7fd3ab036be (diff)
Diffstat (limited to 'hurd/running/qemu.mdwn')
-rw-r--r--hurd/running/qemu.mdwn50
1 files changed, 28 insertions, 22 deletions
diff --git a/hurd/running/qemu.mdwn b/hurd/running/qemu.mdwn
index 97d2a6d..2678448 100644
--- a/hurd/running/qemu.mdwn
+++ b/hurd/running/qemu.mdwn
@@ -91,19 +91,19 @@ If your machine supports hardware acceleration, you should really use the kvm va
-no-kvm-irqchip
-if you are running Linux kernels 2.6.37 or 2.6.38 else IRQs may hang sooner or later. The kvm irq problems will be solved in kernel 2.6.39.
+to the command line, see below, if you are running Linux kernels 2.6.37 or 2.6.38 else IRQs may hang sooner or later. The kvm irq problems will be solved in kernel 2.6.39.
# Installing Debian/Hurd with QEMU using the Debian installer
Note: If you have hardware support, replace the qemu commands below with kvm, e.g. qemu-ing -> kvm-img.
-First off you will need to create a disk image using `qemu-img`. I have set mine to 4 gigabytes, although you should be able to get away with less.
+First off you will need to create a disk image using `qemu-img`. I have set mine to 4 GiB, although you should be able to get away with less.
$ qemu-img create hd0.img 4G
Next you will want to start up QEMU and begin the installation process.
- $ qemu -hda hd0.img -cdrom mini.iso -net nic,model=rtl8139
+ $ qemu -m 512 -hda hd0.img -cdrom mini.iso -net nic,model=rtl8139
Now at his point do the regular install using `hd0` as your harddrive. Partition it and install the base system.
@@ -113,9 +113,9 @@ In the installer make your choice of install option: Default install (or your ch
Country, territory or area: your_choice
Locale: your_choice
-Note that even if you can set the country and locale, your keyboard is not yet supported.
+Note that even if you can set the country and locale, your local keyboard is not yet supported.
-In case of problems with locale settings do the following after the installation is completed
+In case of problems with timezone or locale settings do the following after the installation is completed
To get the correct timezone:
$ dpkg-reconfigure tzdata
@@ -138,13 +138,13 @@ Network: Now configured automatically with dhcp
|
----> SMB server (10.0.2.4)
-Partitioning method: Guided or your choice
+Partitioning method: Guided (or your choice)
Partitioning `/dev/hd0`: All files in one partition.
-Note: Since partman is not yet fixed to set up to mount partitions automatically at reboot, it is crucial that you choose this option for now.
+**Important**: Since partman does not yet mount other partitions than / automatically at reboot, it is crucial that you choose this option for now.
-Once you have finished installing the base system (might take some time) the system is rebooted and next boot will be from the hard disk and your are able to log in to your newly installed GNU/Hurd system.
+Once you have finished installing the base system (might take some time) the system is rebooted and next boot will be from the hard disk. Now you are able to log in to your newly installed GNU/Hurd system.
Also see another text about how to [[gnu/create_an_image]] for the
[[GNU_system|gnu]].
@@ -152,10 +152,13 @@ Also see another text about how to [[gnu/create_an_image]] for the
## Running the installed system
Starting qemu/qemu-kvm:
- $ kvm -m 1024 -net nic,model=rtl8139 -net user,hostfwd=tcp::5555-:22 -hda hurd-install.kvm -vga vmware
+
+ $ kvm -m 512 -net nic,model=rtl8139 -net user,hostfwd=tcp::5555-:22 -hda hd0.img -vga vmware
vmsvga_value_write: guest runs Linux.
-See below on port forwarding in the networking section.
+Note: See below on port forwarding in the networking section.
+
+Note: Using the vmware vga driver is useful for setting up X windows, see [Debian GNU/Hurd] (http://www.debian.org/ports/hurd/hurd-install)
If you have problems with grub hanging during boot with the vmware vga driver: Disable the graphic boot
@@ -191,13 +194,13 @@ You may wish to mount your disk image on your host system to transfer files. To
hd0.img1 * 63 3515903 1757920+ 83 Linux
hd0.img2 3515904 4193279 338688 82 Linux swap / Solaris
-Now take the number of sectors for the beginning of the partition and multiply it by the sector size. My partition starts at sector 63 and I have a sector size of 512 therefor my offset is 32256.
+Now take the number of sectors for the beginning of the partition and multiply it by the sector size. My partition starts at sector 63 and I have a sector size of 512 therefore my offset is 32256. For a start at 2048 the ofsset is 1048576.
# mount -o loop,offset=32256 hd0.img /mnt/diskimage
## Having QEMU create *virtual FAT disk images*
-[Manual](http://www.nongnu.org/qemu/qemu-doc.html#SEC25).
+[Link to the manual](http://www.nongnu.org/qemu/qemu-doc.html#SEC25).
QEMU has a facility to create FAT file systems on-the-fly:
@@ -223,9 +226,13 @@ If you just want to access the internet from within QEMU, you can setup pfinet f
# settrans -afgp /servers/socket/2 /hurd/pfinet -i eth0 -a 10.0.2.15 -g 10.0.2.2 -m 255.255.255.0
# echo "nameserver 10.0.2.3" > /etc/resolv.conf
-Alternately DHCP does work now: dhclient eth0
+Alternately DHCP does work now:
+
+ # dhclient eth0
+
+To get ssh working:
-To get ssh working: apt-get install random-egd openssh-server (Similarly for telnet if preferred)
+ # apt-get install random-egd openssh-server (Similarly for telnet if preferred)
(See also <http://www.nongnu.org/qemu/qemu-doc.html#SEC32>.)
@@ -241,15 +248,14 @@ If you want to connect from the host system to the Hurd system running in QEMU,
## Port Forwarding in QEMU
(In the following we assume we use kvm!)
-#### Contacting Hurd from a terminal in your host system
-This is the recommended way to work with a CLI since you have all your
-keyboard and locale settings are preserved.
+#### Logging in to Hurd from a terminal in your host system
+This is the recommended way to work with a Command Line Interface (CLI) since all your keyboard and locale settings are preserved.
-a) with ssh
+a) with ssh (assuming you have installed openssh-server)
- $ kvm -m 1024 -net nic,model=rtl8139 -net user,hostfwd=tcp::5555-:22 -hda hurd-install.kvm &
+ $ kvm -m 1024 -net nic,model=rtl8139 -net user,hostfwd=tcp::5555-:22 -hda hd0.img &
-Contacting the running Hurd:
+Logging in to the running Hurd:
$ ssh -p5555 localhost
@@ -262,11 +268,11 @@ Copying files:
To host: scp -p file {10.0.2.2,your_host_ip}: .
From host: scp -p {10.0.2.2,your_host_ip}:file .
-b) with telnet
+b) with telnet (assuming you have installed a telnet server, like telnetd)
$ kvm -m 1024 -net nic,model=rtl8139 -net user,hostfwd=tcp::5556-:23 -hda hurd-install.qemu &
-Contacting the running Hurd:
+Logging in to the running Hurd:
$ telnet localhost 5556